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General

Guest houses / Berber villages / local people / Morocco

Guest houses are usually found in the Berber villages and are run by local people, usually a family. They have showers, toilets and nice terraces.

Another type of guesthouse is the riad, which is perhaps the type of housing most prominent in the popular imagination when thinking about living in Morocco. Riads are buildings with a central square in the middle and apartments looking down into the centre. atlas mountain bike have access to small riads with private rooms with private facilities.

offers a new way to travel, taking your time, participating in the preservation of Berber heritage of the High Atlas. We aim to help you discover the richness of the Berber culture of the High Atlas. people have preserved the traditions of the Berbers: Patriarchal family life, hospitality, amazing language, adobe architecture, attics Ighrem defense, agriculture and pastoralism. For your visit, you participate in the development and protection of the culture and maintenance of life in the Atlas .

The guest house is an ideal base for exploring the region, customs and Berber traditions, soak up the difference and the magic of the place, share some special moments. During your stay you will have access to many activities and tours we have designed to be easily achievable.

  •   I had an amazing time in Toubkal. Rachid was my guide during that adventure. He has lot of experience. He helped me find a bood pace so I can save... read more

    thumb Choubi Z
    3/18/2018
  •   We had a great experience hiking in the Atlas mountains, including Toubkal summit, with our guide Rachid. Rachid seems to know al the people in the mountains, is always in... read more

    thumb Fiona v
    4/03/2018
  •   I spent three days with Rachid and couldn't be happier with my experience in the Atlas Mountains. He got me safely to the summit of Mount Toubkal and we spent... read more

    thumb rabbiehaggis
    10/04/2017
  •   We followed the route to Toubkal. Everything was very good. Guide told us a lot about mountains. He waited for everyone and gave us a lot of advices.

    thumb LIT C
    3/11/2018
  •   I'm a single female traveler. Rachid was the only one who answered my queries about guiding me in the Atlas Mountains. He was prompt and helpful leading up the ride.... read more

    jenjuniper
    6/10/2019
  •   Had a great day in the mountains. Picked up at hotel, taxi to imlil, where we collected our bikes before heading up for the pass. Was a tough climb but... read more

    thumb Mark N
    5/27/2019
  •   Atlas Mountain Bike gives you the possibility to live the way Berbers live. You’ll appreciate small things after this amazing journey. Rachid Azdour is a nice and competent guide... read more

    thumb erosi731
    4/25/2019
  •   Although we had some misfortune with a flat tyre and two broken chains, the mood of our guide remained positive and he arranged everything with a smile. We did the... read more

    frankrasschaert2017
    6/22/2019
  •   We had a amazing experience with Atlas Mountain Bike and our perfect guide Rachid!! Rachid know all about Mt.Toubkal, Rachid help all way to summit, he seems know about... read more

    thumb Marija B
    4/17/2019
  •   I came home from my trek in the Atlas mountains a couple of weeks ago and i have been on a high since. Rachid was our guide on our 5... read more

    thumb Anne G
    11/16/2017

We are sorry, there are no reviews yet for this Accommodation.

Atlas mountains

Atlas mountainsAtlas Mountains The Atlas Mountains (Arabic: جبال الأطلس‎, jibāl al-ʾaṭlas; Berber languages: ⵉⴷⵓⵔⴰⵔ ⵏ ⵡⴰⵟⵍⴰⵙ, idurar n waṭlas) are a mountain range in the Maghreb. It stretches around 2,500 km (1,600 mi) through Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia. The range’s highest peak is Toubkal, with an elevation of 4,167 metres (13,671 ft) in southwestern Morocco. It…

Culture and history info

Culture and history infoyou’re exploring the ruins of Volubilis, strolling through the streets of an ancient medina, shopping for spices in a centuries-old souk, or following a chain of pack mules up to a remote Berber village, you can’t escape the power of Moroccan history. In the valleys of the High Atlas, the descendants of the country’s original nomadic inhabitants still live in a remarkably similar style to their ancient ancestors. Architecture in urban areas often carries traces of the Roman and Islamic occupations that helped shape modern Morocco. The country’s history is tied up with the story of the Berber tribes, who repelled the Ancient Roman colonialists with a campaign of harassment, and later survived through a cycle of rising and falling Islamic dynasties. The largely Berber Istiqlal (independence) party aggressively contested the brief French occupation of Morocco during the early 20th century and control was eventually ceded to a line of Moroccan kings. Throughout the latter part of the century borrowing, corruption, poverty, and civil discontent took their toll. Since King Mohammed VI was enthroned in 1999, however, Morocco has instituted sweeping political and economic changes. Poverty is still widespread and unemployment high, but initiatives to attract foreign investment and tourism are bringing new opportunities. The human rights record is markedly improved and today ranks among the cleanest across Africa and the Middle East. Women have benefitted from education initiatives, a new legal code that protects their rights to both divorce and custody, and new protections for Berber (Amazigh) culture including the introduction of Tamazight (written Berber) in schools. The country’s first municipal elections in 2002 were hailed as a step towards democratisation, but Islamist and other political factions are closely monitored, as are news media. Further progress was made during the Arab Spring, which saw thousands of protestors take to the streets of Rabat, Casablanca, Tangier, and Marrakech to demand a new constitution and a change in government. Their peaceful tactics paid off and in spring 2011, the King announced his intention to stamp out corruption and reform the constitution. Immediate changes included handing more executive authority to the prime minister and parliament and making Berber an official national language alongside Arabic.

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